Metallic Epoxy – A Discussion

wabisabi

Introduction

I’m sitting here over the weekend with what little free time I have and I stumbled upon a Facebook post discussing metallic floor installations between other contractors.

Now I hate Facebook, it’s a necessary evil for me with the business and I’m sure there’s lots of good content on there, but it’s just not my thing getting involved in conversations there.

There’s a contractor whom posted a project that he had completed, I think it looked fantastic. Unsure of the exact process of course, I can see smooth transition of the main colour into the base colour creating a nice, blended two tone appearance.

This was one of his early attempts with metallic epoxy, and although he said he was happy with the appearance, he stated he was unhappy with having foreign objects lodge themselves in the final result beyond his control, along with a few small other imperfections. He also wasn’t sure whether he was confident providing this line of work to client who would be expecting perfection.

I stepped in at this stage. As I said before, I hate having conversations over Facebook, but a few things needed to be made clear about metallic epoxy, of which I’ll go into in detail during this post.

Credit: Mark Fautley

Cloudy

I haven’t asked permission to use this image Mark, if you wish it removed, I will do so immediately.

The Right Frame of Mind

Metallic epoxy is artwork. Artwork that is hand crafted by a human being. Human being’s have flaws and faults, we are not perfect no matter how hard we strive to be. These faults come to the forefront through creation of anything that is not perfected with robotics….frig, even then things have little faults in them.

It is in those flaws and imperfections that true beauty is created.

Without being pretentious, I challenge you to look upon the Mona Lisa and tell me there isn’t at least a flaw or two within the brush strokes of that wonderful man Leonardo da Vinci’s masterpiece.

Don’t get me wrong, in no way am I comparing any of our work to anything near the masterpiece’s da Vinci created, it’s just a theory of thought of course.

When installing a custom metallic epoxy floor, we, as the installers (or more to the point artists), are creating something that we are seeing within ourselves and our mind’s eye of which we see matches and blends with the area / surroundings with which we have to work with.

Things like a little a fly that fell into our 100sqm fully customised floor we just installed, or a few small air bubbles caused by the chemical reaction of the products we’re working with, these things only create more beauty to the masterpiece.

They tell the onlookers that this was created by human hands, with love and passion and the installer has given his or her all to express their feelings and emotions into something so special, that you will never see two of the same floors anywhere in the world.

Example Of Thought

For me, this was my latest creation, at my own home for example.

https://walkerconcreting.com.au/2019/03/01/passion-in-depth/

Is it the most perfect work I’ve ever done? Absolutely not.

Is it the perfect colouring matching each tone of the inspiration I acquired to complete this floor? Not even close.

Is there a little bit of foreign matter in the finish and a few spots where blistered occurred and things could have been done better? Hell yes there, I’m HUMAN!

But I put my heart and soul into re-creating a feeling that I gained through light and dark contrasting, yet blending seamlessly at the same time, which gave me strength and helped me feel positive in this unforgiving world we live in.

Inspiration….

Depth

Application….

Depth in Design

In Closing

For me, I’ve done a relative amount of travelling. When I travel, I try to intricately delve into the foreign culture and experience the heart and soul of where I am. Am I the most experience traveller out there? Heck no, I haven’t touched a finger print on this earth really yet.

But one place I’ve been to which completely captured my heart forever. Japan. the country itself was absolutely amazing, but it was the people, the culture and the frame of mind (with everything they do), that really drew me in.

One celebrated train of thought, which is evident throughout travels in Japan if you look close enough, is

“Wabi-sabi – The Celebration of Imperfection”

The actual train of thought may not be 100% in line with creating a flamboyant metallic epoxy installation, but the thought process that not everything needs to be 100% perfect, is inspiring to me.

If you’re after a metallic epoxy installation, through me or another fine artist applying their minds eye to your project area, accept the fact that you will find imperfections if you get down close and look hard enough.

Hell, some might be blatantly obvious.

But if you can stand back, admire the blending of the colouring, the workmanship that has gone into your project, and hopefully find a feeling that coincides with your installer, then you’re job is a one of a kind and an amazing piece of artwork that should be cherished.

wabisabi

2 thoughts on “Metallic Epoxy – A Discussion

  1. Jack Josephsen Reply

    I like your article Ben. My journey with metallic epoxy flooring started back in 2007 and it has taken me to different countries, including Japan where I trained 15 applicators. Even though the concept of metallic floors has been around for over 10 years now, I feel we have only just exposed the tip of the iceberg. We can do so much more but first we must set realistic expectations on ourselves or we will not be willing to push the boundaries due to fears of imperfections.
    Take Care and keep smiling
    Jack

    • Ben Walker Post authorReply

      Thank you so much for you reply Jack. I am in complete agreement with you. What really excites me about these installations is the possibilities are endless. They really do completely allow an installer / artist to create without boundaries. I’m very jealous of your travels within the industry, congratulations to you on your achievements and future endeavours.

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